Tell An Old Joke Day, 2021

According to various websites, listed below, today, July the 24th, is Tell An Old Joke Day. I’ll leave the following links for you to read more about the history and the meaning of this holiday.

https://nationaltoday.com/national-tell-an-old-joke-day/
https://www.daysoftheyear.com/days/tell-an-old-joke-day/
http://holidayinsights.com/moreholidays/August/tellajokeday.htm

So, without further ado, here’s an old joke. I hope you enjoy it.

What did the kid in first year at Catholic school say when asked why they kept walking next to the same person at school?
“I was told I’m supposed to walk by Faith!”

Happy Eat Your Vegetables Day, 2021

While Eat Your Vegetables Day is currently celebrated mostly in the USA, I think its message is so important that it should become an international thing.

It is undeniable and scientifically-proven that vegetables and fruits are an essential part of a healthy lifestyle. Thousands of studies conducted in the field of nutrition over the past decades have highlighted the benefits of a plant-based diet.

If you care about your body and want to improve your health, I recommend you increase your intake of fresh, organic vegetables and fruits. To learn more about Eat Your Vegetables Day, please visit the following websites:

https://nationaldaycalendar.com/days-2/national-eat-your-vegetables-day-june-17/
https://nationaltoday.com/national-eat-vegetables-day/
https://www.timeanddate.com/holidays/fun/eat-your-vegetables-day
https://nextnationalday.com/national-eat-your-vegetables-day/

Some ideas for celebrating Eat Your Vegetables Day are to include vegetables in all your meals today, and to visit your local farmer’s market and get some locally grown produce. If your schedule doesn’t allow it, plan to do so at your earliest convenience.

International Day of Happiness, 2021

The idea of an International Day of Happiness was introduced to the United Nations back in 2011 by the advisor Jayme Illien, along with the United Nations’ New Economic Paradigm project and “happytalism”, which aim to change the way nations approach economic growth by focusing on “happytalism” over capitalism.

The day was founded in July of 2012 and was first observed in 2013. Its celebration is an acknowledgement of the importance and desirability of happiness in human life, and the need that happiness be incorporated into public policy.

Despite being a challenging concept to define, there is a general consensus that happiness broadly covers two key areas – how people feel in the present moment and how satisfied people are with their lives overall. Consequently, happiness can range from a sudden rush of intense emotion (such as joy or euphoria) to a much calmer and steadier sense of contentment.

For ideas on how to celebrate International Day of Happiness this year, check out the following websites:

https://www.un.org/en/observances/happiness-day
https://www.daysoftheyear.com/days/international-day-of-happiness/
https://happinessday.org/
https://www.livehappy.com/practice/happiness-around-world
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Day_of_Happiness

Religious Freedom Day, 2020

On the 16th of January, 1786, soon after the United States of America came into existence as a sovereign nation, the Virginia General Assembly adopted Thomas Jefferson’s landmark Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom. This statute then became the basis for what is known today as the First Amendment, which guarantees religious freedom to all people residing in the U.S.A..

Every year since that time, a statement is released on this same day by the president of the United States, officially proclaiming Religious Freedom Day.

Here is this year’s statement, made by president Donald Trump:

For a list of resources about the importance of Religious Freedom Day, check out the following websites:
https://www.daysoftheyear.com/days/religious-freedom-day/
https://news.yahoo.com/franklin-graham-importance-national-religious-161755667.html

To find out how you can celebrate Religious Freedom Day, I invite you to browse the following articles:

https://www.daysoftheyear.com/days/religious-freedom-day/
https://www.awarenessdays.com/awareness-days-calendar/national-religious-freedom-day-2021/
https://nationaldaycalendar.com/national-religious-freedom-day-january-16/
https://the-armijo-signal.com/20899/current-theme/the-awareness-national-religious-freedom-day-brings/
https://gogateways.org/articles/tag/Religious+Freedom+Day
https://religiousfreedomsunday.com/

Happy Religious Freedom Day, 2020.

Happy 102nd Great Union Day, Romania!

On December the 1th 2020, Romania celebrates its 102nd Great Union Day. This national holiday marks the unification of Transylvania, Bessarabia and Bukovina with the Romanian Kingdom in 1918.

To find out more about Great Union Day, I invite you to read last year’s article: https://lucian-hodoboc.com/happy-101th-anniversary-romania/

If you’re interested in finding out some cool facts about Romania, please watch the following video:

https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=976090446105970

Singles Day (11 11), 2020

There’s an unofficial Chinese holiday celebrated every year on the 11th of November (also known as 11 11 or Double 11) called Singles’ Day. It was started by online retailer Alibaba and you can read more about its history by clicking the links in this article. You can also learn about what it means for Chinese commerce here: https://www.bbc.com/news/business-54876524. Its purpose is to celebrate the unattached, which makes it an antithesis to the romantically-involved on Valentine’s Day.

However, seeing how the holiday is not popular anywhere outside of China, I’m not going to talk about it, but rather I want to include a few videos about what it means to be single for a Christian. This is a selection of videos from Evangelicals, Catholics and Orthodox Christians. Enjoy!

Ben Stuart – Love the Single Chapter of Your Life
Steven Furtick – Singleness, sex and self-control
Kim Zember and Jackie Angel – The Right Way to Be Single
Fr. Mike Schmitz – Learning to be Alone
Fr. Josiah Trenham – Orthodox Dating 101

Conflict Resolution Day, 2020

The Bible teaches us to love peace and to live in harmony. In the Beatitudes from The Sermon on the Mount, Jesus blessed the peacemakers and mentioned that they will be called “Sons of God” (Matthew 5:9).

This is one of the reasons why I think that everyone, and Christians in particular, should observe Conflict Resolution Day, a global event intended to promote the concept of peaceful conflict resolution.

Each Year, since 2005, the Association for Conflict Resolution (ACR) celebrates Conflict Resolution Day the third Thursday of October. This year it is held on October 15.

The ACR logo of the tree was designed as a symbol to celebrate growth in Conflict Resolution. The first year, start small, but, just like the tree, the seeds you plant one year, will continue to grow and blossom each year.

Conflict Resolution Day was conceived in 2005 by the ACR to:

  • Promote awareness of mediation, arbitration, conciliation and other creative, peaceful means of resolving conflict;
  • Promote the use of conflict resolution in schools, families, businesses, communities, governments and the legal system;
  • Recognize the significant contributions of (peaceful) conflict resolvers; and
  • Obtain national synergy by having celebrations happen across the country and around the world on the same day.

October has become a time to promote and celebrate peaceful conflict resolution practices worldwide. Dedicated dispute resolution practitioners are helping to educate the public about mediation and other innovative conflict management processes.

The Art of Listening presentation by Don Schapira for the Conflict Resolution Day Planning Committee

October 1st 2020 – what are you celebrating today?

October 1st seems to be a very popular day. Lots of things seem to be “disputing” their primacy over October 1st. According to various internet sources, World Vegetarian Day, International Coffee Day, Nigeria’s Independence Day, CD Player Day, the feast day of St. Thérèse of Lisieux (in the Catholic Church) and Bring Your Bible To School Day, among others – are all observed every year on this day.

Which of these will you be celebrating, in particular, this year? Which ever it is, I hope you have a lovely day and a blessed month ahead of you!

International Friendship Day, 2020

Created with the purpose of celebrating the bond of friendship in our lives, Friendship Day (also known as International Friendship Day) is observed every year, in many countries, on the 30th of July. According to Wikipedia, the holiday’s date differs in several countries.

To mark this special day and to highlight its importance in promoting the role that friendship plays across all cultures, the UN encourages community groups, organizations, and governments to hold initiatives, activities, and events that promote reconciliation, mutual understanding, and solidarity.

Learn more about it by clicking the following links:

https://www.daysoftheyear.com/days/international-day-of-friendship
https://www.timeanddate.com/holidays/un/friendship-day
https://nationaltoday.com/international-day-friendship
https://www.awarenessdays.com/awareness-days-calendar/world-friendship-day-international-day-of-friendship-2019
https://www.un.org/en/observances/friendship-day

Whether it’s through a virtual message, a phone call, a letter, or any other way that respects the official social distancing rules, tell your friends a happy friendship day and thank them for their friendship. 🙂

Happy International Friendship Day, 2020!

Friendship Day, 2020

Vanilla Ice Cream Day, 2020

Vanilla was discovered in regions of (present-day) Mexico back in the 14th century, when Spanish conquistadors came across vanilla-flavored foods and drinks consumed by Meso-American individuals.

After having been brought back to Spain, vanilla began being used to flavor a drink consisting of honey, water, corn, vanilla, and cacao beans.

The drink eventually spread to England and France, and then the rest of Europe by the early 1600s. In 1602, the apothecary of Queen Elizabeth I, Hugh Morgan, suggested that vanilla should be used separately from cocoa.

Later, the French began using vanilla in ice cream, which was a rather popular dessert in 18th century France. It was Thomas Jefferson who discovered vanilla ice cream in France and brought the recipe to the USA.

Vanilla Ice Cream Day is an unofficial holiday observed every year on the 23rd of July. While having a scoop or two of vanilla ice cream might no do any significant harm to you, provided you don’t suffer from any illnesses, try to not overindulge in the celebration, as too much ice cream can be bad for you, regardless of its flavor.

More info here:
https://www.timeanddate.com/holidays/fun/vanilla-ice-cream-day
https://www.awarenessdays.com/awareness-days-calendar/national-vanilla-ice-cream-day-2020/
https://www.wincalendar.com/Vanilla-Ice-Cream-Day